Archive for January, 2017

https://www.buckeyefirearms.org/changes-ohio-concealed-carry-law-coming-march-21-2017

 

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Off The Wall

Marla W writes…

I just read that you’re speaking at the SHOT show in Las Vegas this week. VERY disappointing. There are already too many guns in this country, and too much faux patriotism surrounding the second amendment. I can’t believe you’d risk your good name associating with a bunch of gun nuts. You’ve lost a fan.

Well, hi there Marla. And Happy Sunday!

It’s true, I’ll be in Vegas this week, addressing a roomful of people who like to shoot guns. I’m not sure what I’m going to say yet – probably the same thing I tell anyone who invites me to discuss the various ways we might close America’s skills gap. But one things for sure – while I’m at there, I’m going to make sure I see my friends at The SEAL Family Foundation.

You’d love these guys, Marla. They look after the families of those involved with Naval Special Warfare. Remember Ty Woods and Glenn Dougherty – two of the men who died in Benghazi? The SEAL Family Foundation raised over $500,000 for their memorial fund.
Anyway, they have a booth at The SHOT Show, so I’m going to stop by and thank them for their efforts, as well as for their help with a team-building event I arranged for my staff before Christmas.

I don’t know if you’ve had much experience with “corporate team-building,” Marla, but I’ve never cared much for such endeavors. I mean really, how much “team spirit” can you inspire at a golf outing? How much “career motivation” can one glean from a “zip line adventure?” How much “self-directed goal setting” can be extracted from watching a magician levitate in some hotel ballroom?

I wanted to do something different for the millennials at mikeroweWORKS, so I called a guy I met through The SEAL Family Foundation, and asked if he could arrange a “non-traditional corporate team event.” Something that might allow my team to rub elbows with veterans. “Ideally,” I said, “I’d like something fun, but uncomfortable.”

Well, it was a great day, Marla, and I wish you could have joined us. We started with skydiving. Jade ditched her five-inch heels, Jordan put her hair in a ponytail, and along with Taylor, (who will do anything,) and Aaron, (who hadn’t even officially started yet,) they  jumped without hesitation. Good for them! Even my old pal Chuck – a non-millennial who once swore he’d never jump out of a perfectly good airplane – turned his fate over to a stranger strapped to his back. (Granted, he crapped his pants on the way out the door, but that’s always been a part of his morning ritual, and hardly noteworthy.)

After that, we reconnoitered to an undisclosed location and introduced ourselves to Matt, Bobby, Jeremy, and Danielle – four SEALs who spent the last fifteen years getting shot at by bad guys and returning the favor – with far superior results. They in turn, introduced us to 20,000 rounds of live ammunition, and an arsenal of firearms not currently available for purchase in the state of California.

For the next few hours, the SEALs took my employees through an accelerated small arms training session. There was an emphasis on safety, obviously. Some of my people had never held a gun before, much less fired one. So there was some…trepidation. But after an hour of intense instruction, everyone got comfortable with the Glock 9mm. Then the AR-15. Then a variety of sniper rifles. We all got to shoot an M-1 from WWII, a Steyr from Austria, the Scar Heavy…even a Barrett 50 caliber. Fifty yards, a hundred yards, then two hundred yards. Their progress was impressive. Their enthusiasm was infectious. At 400 yards, my office manager was hitting a target the size of a pie plate. Unbelievable.

Afterwards, we ate ribs and drank beer in a local bar with our instructors. We also listened to war stories from Ramadi and Fallujah and a few places I hadn’t heard of, from people who wrote the book on teamwork. Fascinating. Eye-opening. Humbling.

I wish I could share their stories here, but for all sorts of reasons, I can’t. What I can tell do, is tell you how remarkable it is to see people who have never even held a gun go from uncomfortable, to tentative, to comfortable, to very comfortable, to empowered. One day Marla, I hope you’ll have the opportunity to experience something similar, and listen to the stories of people who use guns to protect us.

Obviously, you and I have a difference of opinion regarding the role of the second amendment in modern society. But thanks to the first amendment, we can express our differences in whatever way we prefer. We can criticize those with whom we disagree, or we can try to persuade them. We can make a case as to why we believe what we believe, or we can simply announce our disappointment to the world, as though our feelings alone are enough to justify our beliefs.

As for you Marla – you can either stomp off in a cloud of righteous indignation, or you can accompany me to the SHOT Show as my guest, and see what all the fuss is about.

Either way, it’s nice to have choices, don’t you think?

Best,
Mike

PS. If you do want to come, better RSVP quick – I’m leaving tomorrow morning, and you’re gonna need your own hotel room. (Just so we’re clear…)

xo

Mike

Not mine but worth a repost.

Green my backside you spoiled clueless brainwashed whiney good for nuthin little denial freak brats. Ive planted 10s of 1000s of trees. How many have you planted? Ive balanced herds for 60+ years. How many herds have you balanced?
Checking out at the store, the young cashier suggested to the much older lady that she should bring her own grocery bags, because plastic bags are not good for the environment.
The woman apologized to the young girl and explained, “We didn’t have this ‘green thing’ back in my earlier days.”

The young clerk responded, “That’s our problem today. Your generation did not care enough to save our environment for future generations.”

The older lady said that she was right — our generation didn’t have the “green thing” in its day. The older lady went on to explain:
Back then, we returned milk bottles, soda bottles and beer bottles to the store. The store sent them back to the plant to be washed and sterilized and refilled, so it could use the same bottles over and over. So they really were recycled. But we didn’t have the “green thing” back in our day.

Grocery stores bagged our groceries in brown paper bags that we reused for numerous things. Most memorable besides household garbage bags was the use of brown paper bags as book covers for our school books. This was to ensure that public property (the books provided for our use by the school) was not defaced by our scribblings. Then we were able to personalize our books on the brown paper bags. But, too bad we didn’t do the “green thing” back then.
We walked up stairs because we didn’t have an escalator in every store and office building. We walked to the grocery store and didn’t climb into a 300-horsepower machine every time we had to go two blocks.

But she was right. We didn’t have the “green thing” in our day.

Back then we washed the baby’s diapers because we didn’t have the throw away kind. We dried clothes on a line, not in an energy-gobbling machine burning up 220 volts. Wind and solar power really did dry our clothes back in our early days. Kids got hand-me-down clothes from their brothers or sisters, not always brand-new clothing.

But that young lady is right; we didn’t have the “green thing” back in our day.
Back then we had one TV, or radio, in the house — not a TV in every room. And the TV had a small screen the size of a handkerchief (remember them?), not a screen the size of the state of Montana. In the kitchen we blended and stirred by hand because we didn’t have electric machines to do everything for us. When we packaged a fragile item to send in the mail, we used wadded up old newspapers to cushion it, not Styrofoam or plastic bubble wrap. Back then, we didn’t fire up an engine and burn gasoline just to cut the lawn. We used a push mower that ran on human power. We exercised by working so we didn’t need to go to a health club to run on treadmills that operate on electricity.

But she’s right; we didn’t have the “green thing” back then.

We drank from a fountain when we were thirsty instead of using a cup or a plastic bottle every time we had a drink of water. We refilled writing pens with ink instead of buying a new pen, and we replaced the razor blade in a r azor instead of throwing away the whole razor just because the blade got dull.

But we didn’t have the “green thing” back then.

Back then, people took the streetcar or a bus and kids rode their bikes to school or walked instead of turning their moms into a 24-hour taxi service in the family’s $45,000 SUV or van, which cost what a whole house did before the”green thing.” We had one electrical outlet in a room, not an entire bank of sockets to power a dozen appliances. And we didn’t need a computerized gadget to receive a signal beamed from satellites 23,000 miles out in space in order to find the nearest burger joint.

But isn’t it sad the current generation laments how wasteful we old folks were just because we didn’t have the “green thing” back then?

Please forward this on to another selfish old person who needs a lesson in conservation from a smart ass young person.

We don’t like being old in the first place, so it doesn’t take much to piss us off… Especially from a tattooed, multiple pierced smartass who can’t make change without the cash register telling them how much.

http://www.usarmy4life.com/index.php/2017/01/10/breaking-new-bill-to-legalize-silencers-introduced-in-congress-heres-what-you-need-to-know/

 

http://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2017/01/09/gun-control-groups-take-aim-at-legally-obtained-weapons/